Terra Nova Ecological Landscaping blog

02 Sep

Synthetic Turf, Artificial Grass or Stepford Lawns? An update

Since the early part of the 21st century there has been a large trend towards installing the new generation of synthetic turf. This is a (2013) update of an article I wrote in 2009. We have learned a lot and we have plenty more to learn on this subject that will be debated for years to come. This new generation of Astro Turf with names like ‘Eco Turf’’ and ‘Omni Turf’ is being touted as the newest in ‘green’ landscaping. To be sure, there is an impressive list of ecological and access concerns that this turf addresses including:

• no need to water or mow

• no need to install irrigation

• no need to use pesticides to control weeds

• no need to fertilize

• no need to haul away grass clippings.

Some synthetic turf is even made from recycled plastic and is recyclable at the end of its life.

In addition to these benefits synthetic turf fields are used in New York City parks because they:

• Provide even playing surfaces

• Have padding that helps prevent injuries

• Can be used year-round and in most weather

• Do not need to be closed to protect or re-sod grass

• Last a long time with little maintenance

 

That’s the ‘Pro’ list and if I stopped here we might all run out and buy us some plastic grass because it looks like we have solved a bunch of issues all with one product, so what’s not to like?

Stepford Lawns =  pseudo green product

Remember the movie, The Stepford Wives? There’s a part in the movie where one of the Stepford wives gets stabbed and it messes with her wiring and she starts repeating, “I thought we were friends, I thought we were friends.” That’s what I imagine synthetic turf is saying when I stab it with my accusations of it being a pseudo green product.

I’ll start with the deceptively simple argument that my primary distrust of synthetic turf is based on the fact that it is not alive. It does not breathe and therefore it offers no oxygen as a byproduct. On a hot day plastic turf smells like, well, plastic.

The Cons: The downside of fantastic plastic

I have ridden my bicycle past synthetic playing fields on a warm day and the whole neighborhood reeks of melting, off-gassing plastic. Not an enjoyable smell. It certainly is not aromatherapy unless of course you’re from the town of Stepford.

Synthetic turf often includes crumbled automobile tires called ‘infill’ to mimic the look and feel of soil. The “grass” is held upright and given some cushioning by adding a layer of recycled tire rubber. This infill is made up of particles 3 mm in diameter or smaller. Cool, a new way to recycle tires? Not so fast.

Chemicals of Potential Concern

The crumb rubber used in synthetic turf systems is made primarily from recycled waste tires. The tires themselves contain several chemicals of potential concern COPCs, and undergo minimal processing to become crumb rubber. Direct and indirect methods have been used in studies to determine the presence of these COPCs in the crumb rubber. These studies have found polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons (PAHs), volatile organic compounds (VOCs), semivolatile organic compounds (SVOCs), benzothiazole, and certain metals. Studies have also identified phthalates, alkylphenols and benzene, which likely become bonded to tires during their use. Direct analyses confirming the presence of these COPCs in crumb rubber have used vigorous extraction methods. Some COPCs have been identified through indirect methods including analysis of leachate in the environment near where recycled tire products were used or in controlled laboratory studies. Because crumb rubber is a recycled material, the presence and concentrations of COPCs is expected to vary between products and even among batches from the same manufacturer.*

For the COPCs in the crumb rubber to be a health concern for users of the fields, users would have to be exposed to high enough concentrations to increase the risk for health effects. The three possible routes of exposure for COPCs from crumb rubber are inhalation, ingestion and dermal absorption. Crumb rubber, or the dust generated from crumb rubber, may be accidentally ingested by placing fingers in the mouth or not washing hands before eating and after playing on the fields. Young children on the fields may eat the crumb rubber itself. Dust may be breathed in from playing on the field, or vapors that volatilize from the turf may also be inhaled. Some COPCs may also be absorbed through the skin by direct contact.*

Children, especially very young children, have many characteristics which make them uniquely vulnerable to environmental exposures. Children breathe more air per pound of body weight than adults in the same environment and physical activity adds an additional factor to exposure through inhalation. Children also engage in hand-to-mouth behavior and very young children may eat nonfood items, such as rubber crumbs while on the fields. The protective keratinized layer of the skin is not as well developed in children and increases dermal absorption of COPCs as well as increasing evaporative loss of water on hot days. Children also have many more years to develop diseases with long latency periods after exposure. Risk assessments looking at inhalation, ingestion, dermal absorption and the risk for heat stress would have to combine these considerations to be as conservative as possible.*

Patti Wood, executive director of the nonprofit Grassroots Environmental Education, argues, “This crumb rubber is a material that cannot be legally disposed of in landfills or ocean-dumped because of its toxicity. Why on earth should we let our children play on it?” ** 

Guinea Kids

Our kids are now expected to play on a low level toxic surface. During strenuous activities they breathe in these toxic off gasses. Because plastic is not an inert substance, it both leaches and off-gasses pieces of itself. Plastics are known to contain xenoestrogens (zeno estrogens) that are endocrine disruptors. Exposure to xenoestrogens, which are found in pesticides, plastics and other industrial chemicals has been linked to breast and ovarian cancers in women and to decreased testosterone levels and prostate cancer in men. The damaging effects have been found in birds, fish, reptiles, rodents and humans. Exposure to even small amounts of environmental endocrine disruptors concern scientists because hormones such as estrogen act in the body at very low levels measured in parts per billion. This endocrine disruptor, xenoestrogen, can wreak havoc with the puberty cycle in the human body. With synthetic turf, there is direct and close contact with the lungs and skin of the growing bodies of children. This would not seem to me to be a great combination. When will we know if there is a detrimental effect on human health from synthetic turf? Unfortunately the jury is out and won’t report back for years to come. Just call our kids guinea kids.

There is some evidence to suggest that synthetic turf may harbor more bacteria than natural turf. For example, an industry study sponsored by Sprinturf, a maker of synthetic turf, found that infill containing a sand/rubber mixture had 50,000 times higher levels of bacteria than infill made of rubber alone. To address this, the company markets synthetic turf that is “sand-free” as a safer alternative and offers sanitation for those fields already installed. **

The low maintenance myth

The inconvenient truth about athletes is that they fall, spit, sweat and bleed. Since there is an absence of biological life as there would be with growing plants and living soil the sweat and blood or heaven forbid the dog pee does not have the checks and balances of a living system. Consequently Synthetic turf fields have to be doused with antimicrobial solution and washed down.

Proper maintenance of synthetic turf requires that the fields be sanitized to remove bodily fluids and animal droppings; manufacturers market sanitizing products for this purpose. According to Synthetic Turf Sports Fields: A Construction and Maintenance Manual, published in 2006 by the American Sports Builders Association, some synthetic turf owners disinfect their fields as often as twice a month, with more frequent cleanings for sideline areas, where contaminants concentrate. ** 

 The ‘heat island effect’ increased

Because the stuff is not living and breathing, the cooling effect is absent and thus the phenomenon known as the heat island effect is increased. The ‘heat island’ refers to urban air and surface temperatures that are higher than those of nearby rural areas.

One drawback that both fans and critics of synthetic turf agree on is that these fields can get much hotter than natural grass. Stuart Gaffin, an associate research scientist at the Center for Climate Systems Research at Columbia University, initially became involved with the temperature issues of synthetic turf fields while conducting studies for another project on the cooling benefits of urban trees and parks. Using thermal satellite images and geographic information systems, Gaffin noticed that a number of the hottest spots in the city turned out to be synthetic turf fields.** 

The images below comparing air, water, bermudagrass, sand, asphalt, and synthetic turf surface temperatures illustrate how hot a synthetic field can reach during a warm day.

Synthetic Turf copy.jpg

Direct temperature measurements conducted during site visits showed that synthetic turf fields can get up to 60° hotter than grass, with surface temperatures reaching 160°F on summer days. For example, on 6 July 2007, a day in which the atmospheric temperature was 78°F in the early afternoon, the temperature on a grass field that was receiving direct sunlight was 85°F while an adjacent synthetic turf field had heated to 140°F. “Exposures of ten minutes or longer to surface temperatures above 122°F can cause skin injuries, so this is a real concern,” said Joel Forman, medical director of the Pediatric Environmental Health Specialty Unit at Mount Sinai School of Medicine, speaking at a 6 December 2007 symposium on the issue. **

In addition to heat control, the International Hockey Federation requires that college teams saturate with water synthetic turf fields before each practice and game to increase traction, according to an article in the 19 October 2007 Raleigh (North Carolina) News & Observer. The article, which examined why local universities were watering their synthetic turf fields in the midst of severe ongoing drought in the U.S. Southeast, noted that Duke University received a business exemption to water the fields.**

According to the Rubber Manufacturers Association, only 8 states have no restrictions on placing tires in landfills. Most of these restrictions have to do with preventing pest problems and tire fires, which release toxicants such as arsenic, cadmium, lead, nickel, polyaromatic hydrocarbons PAHs, and volatile organic compounds VOCs.**

The storm water runoff from synthetic turf is considered toxic leachate leaching chemicals and toxin’s such as PAH’s, COPCs, cadmium and lead. Where does it go? Straight into our rivers, creeks and oceans.

Soil Food Web Deprived of Oxygen

Synthetic turf lawns are one more non-porous surface that disallows rain to soak into the soil. This causes some serious drainage problems. Because of the toxic runoff and drainage issues, this is a product that is not healthy for the watershed. The soil food web, the vast ‘web’ of life in the soil beneath our feet is under extreme duress under synthetic turf, primarily because this soil is deprived of oxygen. No oxygen, no life and since it is not real soil the ‘infill’ is basically lifeless. Much of the current product being installed today in playing fields is made from virgin plastic, a petroleum product that adds to global warming in its manufacture.

Divorcement from nature

There is a spooky similarity between fake grass and those perpetually perfect Stepford wives. Most of us moviegoers where appropriately horrified to watch the men in the town of Stepford cuddling up to their synthetic spouses. Our response was calculated by Hollywood and the punch line, “I thought we where friends” in the movie was a kind of reverse Judas kiss in the plot line. Of course having a perfect wife had its upsides but it was at the expense of a real life. Therein lies the rub. Synthetic turf is yet another salvo in our separation from nature and natural systems. We may not see this downside right off the bat blinded as we are with all the supposed low maintenance upsides. Nature deficit is a disorder that has snuck up on us as our artificial systems have developed over the years. Living in cities we are surrounded by the built environment. Inside we are in the clutches of the right angles of four walls and a roof, we send our children outside to play on artificial turf that never changes and our divorcement from nature is complete.

Intangible benefits to a field of grass.

William Crain of the City College of New York Psychology Department presents the idea that replacing grass with synthetic turf can hinder children’s creative play and affect their development. “Today’s children largely grow up in synthetic, indoor environments,” he says. “Now, with the growing popularity of synthetic turf fields, their experience with nature will be less than ever.” **

Natural grass does offer tangible benefits. According to Turfgrass Producers International, these include increased

  • pollution control
  • absorption of carbon dioxide
  • a cooling effect
  • water filtration
  • prevention of soil erosion. ** 

One of the great joys in my own life is to witness the cycles of nature, to revel in the changing of the seasons. While it is true that ‘natural’ turf is no shining example of a natural system, synthetic turf takes a giant step in the Stepford direction. Grass that is always the very same shade of green, never grows or changes and is off-gassing toxins instead of exhaling life giving oxygen in no way connects us with the patterns of nature.

Finally it must be asked what happens to synthetic turf fields when they are no longer usable? Industry estimates that synthetic turf fields have a lifespan of 10 to 12 years, whereupon the material must be disposed of appropriately. Rick Doyle, president of the Synthetic Turf Council, says the infill could be cleaned and reused; put to another purpose, such as for rubber asphalt; incinerated; used in place of soil to separate landfill layers; or otherwise recycled. Typically, however, it is landfilled. **

Honest assessment of the issue

This account of the Pro’s and Con’s on the topic of synthetic turf vs. natural turf is by necessity a work in progress. My bias must be more than obvious from the title of this article yet I have made an honest attempt to find the primary Pro’s on the side of synthetic turf and then bring in the primary Con’s from my own and others experience. Every community must make their own determination hopefully after an honest assessment of the issue.

Sorry, image not available
Adi Talwar/City LimitsSoccer players examine the turf at Flushing Meadows-Corona Park.

NYC’s Fake Grass Gamble: A 300M Mistake?

In 1998, New York City began installing synthetic turf fields in parks and playgrounds, saying the artificial material would be more durable than grass. But a City Limits investigation finds that many turf fields are falling apart, including this one at Flushing Meadows-Corona Park.

Triple bottom line really?

A final thought in this realm is to follow the money. Are there entities making profits from the manufacture and installation of synthetic turf that are less than congruent with the common good? This is worth asking. It wouldn’t be the first time product sales where driven by concern for corporate financial bottom line above the social and ecological bottom lines.

There is an alternative

The debate leaves many on the fence. Orlando Gil an assistant research scientist at New York University and soccer coach, is weighing both alternatives: “We want children to play outside, exercise, and play sports, but with pesticides and fertilizers in grass and chemicals in artificial turf, I don’t know which to choose.” **

My response to Orlando is that there is an alternative: organically managed natural turf fields. In general as a ecological landscape contractor I would rather install a food forest than a lawn any day yet when it comes to the essential function of play fields I believe there’s nothing like the real thing.

Our Children’s Trust

Our children trust that we are providing them with a safe place to play. Our challenge is to live up to that trust amidst all of the marketing hoopla about synthetic turf. It is easy to be fooled by the alluring language of this supposed ‘green’ product.

- Ken Foster

* Excerpts from A REVIEW OF THE POTENTIAL HEALTH AND SAFETY RISKS FROM SYNTHETIC TURF FIELDS CONTAINING CRUMB RUBBER INFILL

Prepared for

New York City Department of Health and Mental Hygiene New York, NY

** Excerpts from Synthetic Turf: Health DebateTakes Root by Luz Claudio

13 Aug

Please take the Leaf Blower Task Force Santa Cruz Survey here.

Leaf Blower Task Force Santa Cruz Survey
Click this link to take the leaf blower survey.
1. Please complete the following sentence: ” I have used a leaf blower…”
 
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2. My experience with leaf blowers has been:

 
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3. Which of the following possible benefits are you aware of or interested in? Check all that apply.

 
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4. Which of the following possible hazards are you aware of or cause you concern? Check all that apply.

 
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5. In your opinion, how effective are leaf blowers?

 
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6. How important to you is leaf blower use education?

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7. Would you be in favor of voluntary guidelines for leaf blower use?

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8. Which of the following are you willing to donate to the Leaf Blower Task Force Santa Cruz? (Select all that apply.)

 
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9. For statistical purposes please provide your zip code:

10. Thank you for taking the time to complete this survey. We appreciate your feedback.
Please include your information below if you’d like us to contact you:
Click this link to take the leaf blower survey.
1. Please complete the following sentence: ” I have used a leaf blower…”
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2. My experience with leaf blowers has been:

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3. Which of the following possible benefits are you aware of or interested in? Check all that apply.

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4. Which of the following possible hazards are you aware of or cause you concern? Check all that apply.

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5. In your opinion, how effective are leaf blowers?

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6. How important to you is leaf blower use education?

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7. Would you be in favor of voluntary guidelines for leaf blower use?

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8. Which of the following are you willing to donate to the Leaf Blower Task Force Santa Cruz? (Select all that apply.)

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9. For statistical purposes please provide your zip code:

10. Thank you for taking the time to complete this survey. We appreciate your feedback.
Please include your information below if you’d like us to contact you:

11 Aug

Terra Nova in the news!

Terra Nova makes KSBW news

KICK UP A LOT OF DUST …BUT NOW SANTA CRUZ IS CONSIDERING RULES AGAINST IT. THERE’S AN INDEPENDENT TASK FORCE LOOKING AT POSSIBLE SUGGESTIONS AND REGULATIONS ON HOW AND WHEN LEAF BLOWERS ARE USED. THEY’VE EVEN SET UP AN ON-LINE SURVEY TO GET PUBLIC INPUT. ACTION NEWS REPORTER PHIL GOMEZ, JOINS US LIVE FROM SANTA CRUZ WITH MORE ON THE PLAN

…PHIL??? THE SANTA CRUZ LEAFBLOWER TASK FORCE IS NOT ASSOCIATED WITH THE CITY OR COUNTY. IT’S AN INDEPENDENT GROUP FORMED TO GET AS MUCH INPUT ABOUT WHAT CAN OR SHOULD BE DONE WITH LEAF BLOWERS. THEY’VE GOT AN ON-LINE SURVEY OUT. THE INFORMATION GATHERED WOULD BE USED TO EDUCATE THE PUBLIC AND LEAF BLOWERS. ALOHA LANDSCAPE OWNER PHIL ROBERSON ADMITS HIS TOOLS OF THE TRADE ARE NOISY AND BLOW AROUND DUST, BUT THEY MEET HIS CUSTOMERS NEEDS. So far, it’s the fastest and most efficient way for cleaning up and until there’s an alternative option, that’s it for now. A FEW MONTHS AGO KEN FOSTER OF TERRA NOVA LANDSCAPING SET UP A TASK FORCE.

THERE ARE NO PLANS TO BAN LEAF BLOWERS BUT THERE ARE PLANS TO EDUCATE ABOUT RESPONSIBLE USE. We quickly realized We just couldn’t ban blowers out right it would be a hardship for a lot of businesses especially if they’re not educated about the problems. THE CALIFORNIA LANDSCAPE CONTRACTORS ASSOCIATION OPPOSES LEAF BLOWER BANS BUT ADDS “LEAF BLOWERS SAVE SIGNIFICANT TIME AND MONEY, BUT THEY SHOULD BE USED JUDICIOUSLY AND COURTEOUSLY.” ROBSONS COMPANY USES GAS POWERED EQUIPMENT BECAUSE ELECTRICAL PLUG-INS AREN’T CONVENIENTLY LOCATED …AND USING A BROOM JUST ISN’T COST EFFECTIVE OR FAST ENOUGH DURING CLEAN UP. If they did come uip with a battery operation solution that was powerful and effective, Great, we’d be happy to use it!” THE LEAF BLOWER TASK FORCE HAS SET UP AN ON LINE SURVEY ON LEAF BLOWER USE. IT’S A TEN QUESTION SURVEY ON SURVEY MONKEY DOT COM THAT ASKS QUESTIONS LIKE: Which of the following possible hazards are you aware of or cause you concern? AND In your opinion, how effective are leave blowers? The thing were’ looking at is gathering information in the community and then to look at an educational program that teaches people who insist on using a leave blower how to use it responsibly and respectfully in the community.

LIVE THE INFORMATION GATHERED FROM THE SURVEY WILL BE USED TO PETITION THE SANTA CRUZ CITY COUNCIL AND POSSIBLY THE BOARD OF SUPERVISORS TO FUND EDUCATIONAL MATERIALS AND THEY’RE ALSO ASKING LEAF BLOWERS TO PLEDGE RESPONSIBLE USE. THE LEAF BLOWER SURVEY CAN BE FOUND ON SURVEY MONKEY DOT COM. IT’LL BE UP UNTIL OCTOBER 15TH. THE LEAF BLOWER TASK FORCE ALSO HAS ITS OWN FACEBOOKPAGE WHERE YOU CAN FIND OUT ADDITIONAL

Read more: http://www.ksbw.com/news/central-california/santa-cruz/Santa-Cruz-leaf-blower-task-force-formed/-/5738976/21410846/-/w2u1ts/-/index.html#ixzz2bggpbkrm

http://www.ksbw.com/news/central-california/santa-cruz/Santa-Cruz-leaf-blower-task-force-formed/-/5738976/21410846/-/w2u1ts/-/index.html#ixzz2bXxGNCs0

 

Take the survey here…

Leaf Blower Survey

02 May

Terra Nova made runner up in Good Times poll and Gold in the Santa Cruz Weekly readers poll in the same month! Thank you Santa Cruz!

We are very honored to receive these two acknowledgements from our community. Thank you Santa Cruz!

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

22 Apr

IF you want to have your voice heard on this issue Please join us at the Leaf Blower Task Force Santa Cruz Meeting Thursday, April 25th, 3:00PM at the Ecology Action meeting room.

03 Apr

Terra Nova Wins Gold In Santa Cruz Weekly readers poll!

29 Mar

Terra Nova’s check list to help assess the ecological health of a site.

Ecological Landscape Management check list

An ecologically healthy landscape

 

Soil Health

  • How is the soil health over all?
  • Compaction?
  • Over or under watered?
  • What % of organic matter is in soil ?
  • Are leaves allowed to create natural mulch when possible?
  • What type of soil is on site?
  • Mycelium inoculation needed?
  • What is the health of the Soil Food Web ?
  • Jar soil test conducted?
  • Is there a need for a soil test?
  • Is there sufficient mulch to cover soil?

Water management

  • Irrigation controller schedule?
  • Irrigation efficiency?
  • Coverage uniform?
  • Hydrozones? Is the irrigation plant appropriate?
  • Leaks?
  • Graywater system in place?
  • Rainwater Catchment ?
  • Stormwater management?
  • Bio-swales?
  • Rain Garden?
  • Mulch in place to prevent evaporation?
  • Has the site had a water/irrigation audit performed?

Weed management

  • How is weed management working?
  • Are weeds controlled before going to seed?
  • Is sheet mulch being employed?
  • Are weeds: hoed, pulled and mulched often enough?
  • Non toxic herbicides being used? Vinegar, Burn Out (product), etc.

 Plant health

  • Are plants in the right place for sun and shade requirements?
  • Is appropriate pruning being employed?
  • Irrigation: over or under watering?
  • Nutrient deficiencies?
  • Pest problems?
  • Damaged foliage?

Is the landscape serving best needs for all users?

  • Humans? Pets? Wildlife?

How is it looking?

  • How are the aesthetics of the site. Is it consistent with the intent of the design?
  • Overall?
  • Individual elements? ie, the plants, water features and other design features, the hardscape and the mulch?
  • Is there a need for re-design?
  •  Has the site had a Sustainable Landscape Audit performed?

- Terra Nova Landscape Management Team

27 Jan

Ken’s ride to the Eco Farm Conference 2013.

A photo essay of Ken’s ride to the annual Eco Farm Conference.

Terra Nova owner Ken Foster is on the planning committee for the conference and has ridden his bike there since the year 2000.

    

Ken on his thirteenth ride from Santa Cruz to the Eco Farm Conference in Pacific Grove. A few sights along the way: a couple of heritage goats and swallow nests under a bridge.

Amigo Bob Cantisano, the founder of the Eco Farm Conference.

Josiah Raison Cain at a workshop that Ken moderated called Edible Architecture.  

Some of Josiah’s projects.

 A good crowd showed up for the Edible Architecture workshop.

 The winners of the annual ‘Sustie’ awards. The Emmy Awards of Sustainable Farming.

Ken proposed and moderated a workshop called, Permaculture, the Transition Initiative and the future of farming. Here’s Ken with presenter Penny Livingston at the session. Penny is the co-founder of the Regenerative Design Institute.

 

The sunset and moon rise over strawberry fields on the ride home from the conference.

A perfect conclusion to an amazing Eco Farm adventure.

 

22 Jan

Terra Nova takes leadership……………………………………………………………………. Santa Cruz County group to study leaf blower rules

Article Reprinted from the Tuesday, January 22, 2013 Santa Cruz Sentinel
By Jason HoppinSanta Cruz Sentinel Posted: 01/21/2013 03:56:59 PM
A local task force is in the early stages of studying whether to regulate leaf blowers — the always-droning, often-jarring, go-to staple of the landscape industry.

More than a dozen California cities have special rules for the backpack-sized machines, with several — Berkeley, Beverly Hills, Santa Barbara and Los Angeles among them — banning gas-powered versions outright. Critics call them a noisy headache that kicks up dust and pollutes the air.

“We see fit to destroy the sound scape in vain pursuit to perfect the landscape. It’s crazy,” said Ken Foster of Terra Nova Landscaping, who stopped using gas leaf blowers years ago. “There’s a lot of other ways we can achieve beauty.”

Foster is organizing the inaugural meeting of the task force in early February. He is hoping to draw as many interested parties and as much input as possible on what can, or should, be done.

The first order of business is to articulate the problem, Foster said. After that, he wants to research what works in other communities — whether it’s restrictions, a ban or just education — before possibly taking recommendations to local governments.

The California Landscape Contractors Association opposes leaf blower bans, while acknowledging concerns about their operation. The group makes several recommendations on their use, including noting there rarely is cause to use blowers on full throttle.

But the Sacramento-based group maintains leaf blowers
are fundamental tools and time-savers that efficiently clean rock, gravel or bark-covered areas.
“Leaf blowers are essential for landscape maintenance professionals,” the group said in a statement.

Phil Roberson, owner of Aloha Landscape, said leaf blowers are a necessary evil, particularly when it comes to large commercial clients. He said he instructs employees about proper leaf blower operation, but without them “there is no business.”

“I actually can’t stand leaf blowers,” Roberson said. “It’s the most efficient way, when you’re paying employees, to clean up a job.”

There are electric leaf blowers — though Santa Monica bans even those — and while Foster said they’re preferable, they still don’t address the issue of kicking up particulate matter, which can include pesticides, fecal material or brake dust.

“It’s a little bit like organic heroin. No matter how much effort you put into being ecological, it’s still a bad idea,” Foster said.

While the primary driver of regulations is noise — the machines sound like a bumble bee with an amplifier — environmentalists also are focusing more on leaf blowers and other equipment with small combustion engines.

However, neither the city of Santa Cruz nor the county address two-stroke engines in their plans to minimize climate change.

Since they burn both oil and gas, two-stroke engines can release more emissions into the environment than passenger trucks. And studies have shown two-stroke marine engines can splutter a quarter of their fuel, unused, into the water.

The Landscape Contractors Association calls air emissions a “spurious issue,” citing tougher state emissions standards and leaf blowers’ intermittent use. It also said any regulation on those grounds should be left to state and federal authorities.

For nearly two decades, the state Air Resources Board has enacted tougher restrictions for all two-stroke engines. Some local jurisdictions have even tougher rules on them, with older marine engines banned on Lake Tahoe and some Santa Clara County reservoirs, for example.

And when personal watercraft such as Jet Skis were banned from the Monterey Bay National Marine Sanctuary in 2008, the National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration cited not only their erratic operation, but also reports noting two-stroke engine pollution.

Follow Sentinel reporter Jason Hoppin on Twitter at Twitter.com/scnewsdude

IF YOU GO

Leaf blower task force

WHAT: Inaugural meeting
WHEN: 7-9 p.m. Feb. 7
WHERE: Ecology Action, 877 Cedar St., Suite 240, Santa Cruz
DETAILS: 831-359-5717 or ken@terranovalandscaping.com

Jason Hoppin (scnewsdude) on Twitter
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Jason Hoppin (scnewsdude) on Twitter
twitter.com
Instantly connect to what’s most important to you. Follow your friends, experts, favorite celebrities, and breaking news.

18 Jan

Alternatives to the gas powered leaf blower…….. Read it and sweep.

I’m going to think out loud here which I promise won’t be anywhere near as loud as a gas leaf blower in use. I’m thinking of alternatives to that particular piece of landscape equipment we love to hate. And while this may seem like I am just blowing hot air do keep an ear out for viable alternatives to the aptly named ‘Polluting Noise Bazookas’. Maybe there is a new idea here that I should run out and file a patent for because they are so good at collecting debris. A clean hardscape seems to be an obsession of ours. So let’s take a look at some of the alternative options to gas leaf blowers.

Some of these ideas may seem old fashioned, arcane or even silly yet we need to look at all options. The hope? … of finding a better way to get the job done than this…

Exhibit number 1:  The old stand-by is the broom made with broomcom. The broom has an impressive list of benefits, it is:

  • smaller than a blower
  • light weight
  • not a target of theft as a gas leaf blower is
  • cheaper
  • fossil fuel free and runs on orange juice and toast
  • exhaust free
  • very quiet
  • possible to be made from sustainable materials

Not bad for a piece of wood and some broomcorn bristles  :)

Consider the Grandmother Proves Rake and Broom as Fast as Leaf Blowers story.

1

Can’t forget the rake ( number 1.5) as a partner sometimes in preparation for sweeping with a broom.

1.5

Number 2 and 3 are variations on the broom, so they have all the same benefits but can be home made and free. I’ve been known to make an impromptu broom out of a palm frond. These two examples are whisk type brooms that can be made from a variety of plant materials .

2

  

3

The sweeper on wheels (number 4) has some potential for quiet efficient sweeping.

4

 

Number 5 is just a piece of fabric like a common 8′ x 8′ burlap landscape tote that can be used with a whisking action to clean a sidewalk.

5

Number 6. Here’ s my big idea, built a better billow! we’re talking a giant light weight billow that can be used to blow leaves. Patent time?

6

 

 

 

Number 7 is my personal favorite. Owen Dell’s hilarious blower alternative,

a modified bag pipe.

For small debris just use your lungs, no patent required, number 8.

8

There is a variety of trucks that vacuum or sweep, (number 9 ).
Big parking lots that require sweeping can use these. It is an alternative to a leaf blower yet it has it’s own downsides. At least it’s not blowing dust around.

Hosing off the driveway is an old practice that is wasteful of water. Number 10. There are however advances in equipment like this water broom, (number 11) that uses a fraction of the water of a hose for a quick clean sweep.

10

        

11

The equipment manufacturer Stihl makes a Lithium Ion battery operated blower. Then if you had some solar panels you could have a solar powered blower. kind of like organic heroin maybe? There are also propane powered blowers available.

The leaf Blower Pollutuion Task Force Santa Cruz will be looking at alternatives to gas powered

leaf blowers. Some of these options might be of interest to them.

The Leaf Blower Pollution Task Force Santa Cruz Facebook page .

Learn more about the down sides of gas leaf blowers.

Which alternative is your favorite? Do tell.

 

 

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